This article was first published at IHS Markit (subscription required), 3 September 2020

The internet has become a platform for selling food across the globe. This phenomenon has even increased with the COVID-19 pandemic. However, some malevolent operators use the current crisis as a business opportunity and have freed themselves from the EU food

Especially in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, authorities continue to carefully enforce the rules that help consumers make well-informed choices about the food they consume. Katia Merten-Lentz reflects on the food labelling requirements food business operators need to adhere to (article available in French only)

This article was published in Agra

This article was first published by IEG Policy Agribusiness on 7 February 2020

Katia Merten-Lentz of international law firm, Keller and Heckman, writes on how the EU is taking a broader approach to official controls in the food supply chain.

The Official Controls Regulation (EU) 2017/625 – the new OCR – entered into force

Online food sales still need a clear definition and a proper legal framework at EU level to successfully take advantage of the cybermarket and create new opportunities for food business operators in the EU, writes Katia Merten-Lentz of international law firm, Keller and Heckman.

This article is powered by EU Food Law – Published

When food fraud is committed, what are the sanctions?

As food fraud is such a broad matter, the legal framework surrounding sanctions is complex. Last year’s decision by the Tribunal de Grande Instance in Paris on the case of lasagna containing horsemeat instead of beef, provides us with an opportunity to explore how food fraud