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The decision particularly affects those players who had looked to take advantage of ambiguous regulations and interpreted the legislation (in particular (EC) 258/97) that whole insects did not need to be considered ‘new’ in the European Union. In her latest article for Les Marchés, Katia Merten-Lentz explores the decision, and what it means for producers

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Katia Merten-Lentz of international law firm Keller and Heckman looks at how the EU’s regulation of traditional foods from third countries is proving to be a challenge for companies to successfully navigate.

This article is powered by EU Food Law

Since 1997, any food that was not consumed to a significant degree within European

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This article was published at Footprint.

New laws are being designed to accelerate the growth of novel foods, including algae, insects and cultured meat, but will Brexit put the brakes on things?

Novelty can contribute substantially to the success of a restaurant or catering company, offering customers something new and competitors something to think

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Cannabidiol (‘CBD’) has burst onto the world stage in recent years, and the EU is no exception, with shops selling CBD products opening up in various countries across Europe. While CBD can be incorporated into cosmetics and used for medical uses, it is quickly gaining traction in the food and drink market, with CBD found

Yarrowia lipolytica yeast biomass authorized as a Novel Food under EU law[1]

Following the publication of the Commission Implementing Regulation (EU) 2019/760[2], a new Novel Food “Yarrowia lipolytica yeast biomass” will soon be authorized in the EU market.

The “Yarrowia lipolytica yeast heat-killed biomass” has been authorized in food

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Updated regulations are simplifying the authorization process for traditional foods entering European markets from non-member state countries. In their article, “Nouveaux aliments des pays tiers : un premier bilan encourageant”, which appeared in Les Marchés on January 25, 2019, Katia Merten-Lentz and Caroline Commandeur discuss the new regulations and their potential impact on the food

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Edible insect legislation

Traditional sources of protein are sometimes controversial for a number of reasons; therefore, in recent years insects have been touted as a potential replacement to meat products. The human consumption of crickets and other insects was last clarified in late 2015, when the European rules on novel foods were updated. In the