The legal vagueness surrounding CBD is gradually resolving in France. The Court of Cassation recently rendered a judgment in the context of an appeal concerning the legality of the sale of CBD-based products in a specialist store in Dijon.  (French read only: Arrêt n°655 du 4 juin 2021 (21-81.656) – Cour de cassation – Assemblée

The European Court of Justice had a progressive reading last November of the two international reference texts for CBD: the 1971 United Nations Convention on psychotropic substances and the United Nations Convention of 1961 on narcotics. It was concluded that CBD does not behave, in principle as a psychotropic drug and in the current state

Photo of Katia Merten-Lentz

On November 19, the EU’s Court of Justice gave the long-awaited judgment on the classification of cannabidiol (CBD). The Court judged that CBD cannot be qualified as a “narcotic” in the eyes of the law. As a result, CBD products can be marketed and benefit from the free movement guaranteed by Articles 34 to 36

Last month, Katia merten-Lentz was delighted to give her insights on CBD and Novel Foods to FoodNavigator.

CBD is considered a Novel Food by European regulators. While many CBD products remain on the market, they have not been authorised by European authorities. FoodNavigator takes a look at the path to compliance and tries to shed

Photo of Katia Merten-Lentz

Cannabidiol (‘CBD’) has burst onto the world stage in recent years, and the EU is no exception, with shops selling CBD products opening up in various countries across Europe. While CBD can be incorporated into cosmetics and used for medical uses, it is quickly gaining traction in the food and drink market, with CBD found