Photo of Katia Merten-Lentz

Katia Merten-Lentz, partner resident in the Firm’s Brussels and Paris offices, is a leading practitioner in European food, feed, and agricultural law. Her practice also extends to Environmental Law, Biotechnologies (new breeding technologies) and Cosmetics Law.

Ms. Merten-Lentz assists clients throughout the food chain with issues ranging from marketing (food labeling, health and nutrition claims, organic labels etc.) to innovation (nanomaterials, genetically modified organisms, novel foods). She also helps clients in the food and feed area obtaining European authorization for new additives, enzymes and novel foods. Read More

This article was first published at FoodNavigator on 24 March 2020. Written by Katia Merten-Lentz with the support of Manon Ombredane

Once again the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) has moved to clarify clarify the rules applicable to health claims. 

Recently, the CJEU had the opportunity to further clarify the provisions of

This article was published at Footprint.

New laws are being designed to accelerate the growth of novel foods, including algae, insects and cultured meat, but will Brexit put the brakes on things?

Novelty can contribute substantially to the success of a restaurant or catering company, offering customers something new and competitors something to think

This article was first published by IEG Policy Agribusiness on 7 February 2020

Katia Merten-Lentz of international law firm, Keller and Heckman, writes on how the EU is taking a broader approach to official controls in the food supply chain.

The Official Controls Regulation (EU) 2017/625 – the new OCR – entered into force

This article was first published in the World Food Regulation Review January 2020, Vol. 29, Number 8

This article explains the main topics discussed by 400+ global food safety and nutrition regulators during the Codex Alimentarius Committee on Nutrition and Foods for Special Dietary Uses (CCNFSDU41) in Düsseldorf from 24 to 29 November 2019.

 

Online food sales still need a clear definition and a proper legal framework at EU level to successfully take advantage of the cybermarket and create new opportunities for food business operators in the EU, writes Katia Merten-Lentz of international law firm, Keller and Heckman.

This article is powered by EU Food Law – Published

Yesterday, the 41st session of the Codex alimentarius Committee on Nutrition and Foods for Special Dietary Uses (CCNFSDU41) started  in Dusseldorf (Germany).  The meeting was preceded by a working group to finalise recommendations to the plenary on a mechanism for future inclusion of food additives in “baby – and other special dietary uses – foods”

Katia Merten-Lentz and Caroline Commandeur of international law firm Keller and Heckman look at how member states are moving to define, in legal terms, what “clean labelling” is, and the consequences of defining it.

In order to meet consumer expectation for more transparency and clarity in the labelling of foodstuffs, agri-food manufacturers have been