Photo of Katia Merten-Lentz

Katia Merten-Lentz, partner resident in the Firm’s Brussels and Paris offices, is a leading practitioner in European food, feed, and agricultural law. Her practice also extends to Environmental Law, Biotechnologies (new breeding technologies) and Cosmetics Law.

Ms. Merten-Lentz assists clients throughout the food chain with issues ranging from marketing (food labeling, health and nutrition claims, organic labels etc.) to innovation (nanomaterials, genetically modified organisms, novel foods). She also helps clients in the food and feed area obtaining European authorization for new additives, enzymes and novel foods. Read More

As ‘clean’ eating has become more desirable, food manufacturers have re-assessed how they are labelling their foods in a bid to boost the appeal of their products. This includes manufacturers replacing additives (‘E numbers’) with ‘natural’ ingredients that have the same function. It’s easy to understand the attractiveness of such a swap, but to be

This article was first published by Food Navigator on August 22, 2019.

The EU-Canada trade deal, which came into force on a temporary basis in 2017, is working its way through national legislators for approval. The controversial agreement raises a number of questions about labelling and transparency. Katia Merten-Lentz, partner at Keller and Heckman, takes

On 15 May 2018, the World Health Organization (WHO) called for the elimination of industrially-produced trans-fatty acids from the global food supply and released draft guidelines on saturated fatty acid and trans-fatty acid intake for adults and children. The draft guidelines suggest that adults and children reduce their intake of saturated fatty acids to less

This article was first published in the World Food Regulation Review June Issue Vol. 29, Number 1

The 45th session of the Codex Alimentarius Committee on Food Labelling (CCFL45) succeeded in improving the proposed draft guidelines for countries and business operators on mandatory and voluntary labelling provisions for non-retail containers of food and food ingredients

The controversy surrounding the safety evaluations of glyphosate by public European bodies, in particular the European Food Safety Agency (EFSA), has had its impact on the EU General Food Law reform, Katia Merten-Lentz, partner at Keller and Heckman, suggests. On June 13th, following the approval by the European Parliament on 17 April 2019,

Earlier this month, Katia Merten-Lentz was interviewed by RTBF journalist Véronique Thyberghien on food additives in her live show, “Tendances Première.” Issues discussed during the interview include cross-border definition problems, correct labelling, consumer safety, and the “bio” food trend.

To access the full interview, click here.

This article was first published by IEG Policy  on May 29, 2019.

ANALYSIS

For the past few years, ever more European industries have been following the ‘clean label trend’, in response to consumers’ demand for more natural and authentic foodstuffs. This approach focuses, in particular, on the declaration of ingredients, to make it as clear

Today, the EU Official journal published Regulation (EU) 2019/787 on the definition, description, presentation and labelling of spirit drinks, the use of the names of spirit drinks in the presentation and labelling of other foodstuffs, the protection of geographical indications for spirit drinks, the use of ethyl alcohol and distillates of agricultural origin in alcoholic

Written by Katia Merten-Lentz[1]

European regulators have agreed key changes to the food safety authorization process in a bid to increase transparency and boost consumer trust. Katia Merten-Lentz, partner at Keller and Heckman, discusses the impact these changes could have.

Earlier this month, the European Parliament approved by an undisputable majority (603 votes in